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One of the world’s foremost bitcoin and open blockchain experts.

Public Speaker | Author | Coder | Entrepreneur | Commentator

He is known for delivering electric talks that combine economics, psychology, technology, and game theory with current events, personal anecdote, and historical precedent effortlessly transliterating the complex issues of blockchain technology out of the abstract and into the real world. 
                                                             https://antonopoulos.com

Bitcoin, security, entrepreneur, coder, hacker, pundit, humanist, pacifist. Working on crypto-currencies, wrote Mastering Bitcoin                                                                                  
                                                                     http://bitcoinbook.info

Mobirise
Mobirise

My first Mentor

     a teaching fellow with the University of Nicosia   

OTHER COURSES TAKEN & ACCREDITATIONS OBTAINED: 


   https://www.udemy.com/introduction-to-cryptocurrencies/

An Introduction to Cryptocurrencies: (A functional and economic 

understanding of this new radical technology)   -   


  Blockchain Essentials 

   Blockchain Foundation Developer

                               https://www-03.ibm.com/services/learning/     

                                                          



START THE LEARNING CURVE

You will do no better than to start with this seven day course from                                                  https://99bitcoins.com
Just sign up on the form on their website and start learning

                                                                 A Beginner's Guide To Blockchain
 By Bernard Marr

You may have heard the term ‘blockchain’ and dismissed it as a fad, a buzzword, or even technical jargon. But I believe blockchain is a technological advance that will have wide-reaching implications that will not just transform the financial services but many other businesses and industries. 
A blockchain is a distributed database, meaning that the storage devices for the database are not all connected to a common processor. It maintains a growing list of ordered records, called blocks. Each block has a timestamp and a link to a previous block.
Users can only edit the parts of the blockchain that they “own” by possessing the private keys necessary to write to the file. Cryptography ensures that everyone’s copy of the distributed blockchain is kept in synch.
Blockchains are secure databases by design. The concept was introduced in 2008 by Satoshi Nakamoto, and then implemented for the first time in 2009 as part of the digital bitcoin currency; the blockchain serves as the public ledger for all bitcoin transactions. By using a blockchain system, bitcoin was the first digital currency to solve the double spending problem (unlike physical coins or tokens, electronic files can be duplicated and spent twice) without the use of an authoritative body or central server.

The security is built into a blockchain system through the distributed timestamping server and peer-to-peer network, and the result is a database that is managed autonomously in a decentralized way. This makes blockchains excellent for recording events — like medical records — transactions, identity management, and proving provenance. It is, essentially, offering the potential of mass disintermediation of trade and transaction processing.

How does blockchain really work?
Some people have called blockchain the “internet of value” which I think is a good metaphor.
On the internet, anyone can publish information and then others can access it anywhere in the world. A blockchain allows anyone to send value anywhere in the world where the blockchain file can be accessed. But you must have a private, cryptographically created key to edit only the blocks you “own.”
Using your private key and someone else's public key you can transfer the value of whatever is stored in that section of the blockchain.
So, to use the bitcoin example, keys are used to transfer blocks, which contain units of currency that have financial value. This fills the role of recording the transfer, which is traditionally carried out by banks.
It also fills a second role, establishing trust and identity, because no one can edit a blockchain without having the corresponding keys. Edits not verified by those keys are rejected by the network. Of course, the keys — like a physical currency — could theoretically be stolen, but a few lines of computer code can generally be kept secure at very little expense. (Unlike, say, the expense of storing a cache of gold in a proverbial Fort Knox.)
This means that the major functions carried out by banks — verifying identities to prevent fraud and then recording legitimate transactions — can be carried out by a blockchain more quickly and accurately.

Why is blockchain important?
We are all now used to sharing information through a decentralized online platform: the internet. But when it comes to transferring value – e.g. money, ownership rights, intellectual property, etc. – we are usually forced to fall back on old-fashioned, centralized institutions or establishments like banks or government agencies. Even online payment methods which have sprung into existence since the birth of the internet – PayPal being the most obvious example – generally require integration with a bank account or credit card to be useful.
Blockchain technology offers the intriguing possibility of eliminating this “middleman”. It does this by filling three important roles – recording transactions, establishing identity and establishing contracts – traditionally carried out by the financial services sector.
This has huge implications because, worldwide, the financial services market is the largest sector of industry by market capitalization. Replacing even a fraction of this with a blockchain system would result in a huge disruption of the financial services industry, but also a massive increase in efficiencies.
The third role, establishing contracts, opens up a treasure trove of opportunities. Apart from a unit of value (like a bitcoin), blockchain can be used to store any kind of digital information, including computer code.
That snippet of code could be programmed to execute whenever certain parties enter their keys, thereby agreeing to a contract. The same code could read from external data feeds — stock prices, weather reports, news headlines, or anything that can be parsed by a computer, really — to create contracts that are automatically filed when certain conditions are met.
These are known as “smart contracts,” and the possibilities for their use are practically endless.
For example, your smart thermostat might communicate energy usage to a smart grid; when a certain number of wattage hours has been reached, another blockchain automatically transfers value from your account to the electric company, effectively automating the meter reader and the billing process.
Or, smart contracts might be put to use in the regulation of intellectual property, controlling how many times a user can access, share, or copy something. It could be used to create fraud-proof voting systems, censorship-resistant information distribution, and much more.
The point is that the potential uses for this technology are vast, and I predict that more and more industries will find ways to put it to good use in the very near future.

                                                                         

EXTRACT FROM BITCOIN FOR DUMMIES:

Bitcoin has gotten a lot of press, and not all of it good. So is it Internet money, an alternative currency, a parallel financial system, a new way of life? The answer is yes, it’s all of those things and more. Start by finding out the basics of what it is, where it came from, what it does. You can buy bitcoins just like you can buy ice cream and concert tickets. But you can’t really keep them under your mattress or in your piggy bank — or your regular bank account, for that matter. In fact, you had better pay some extra attention to securing your bitcoins once you get some. Bitcoins don’t come from any gothic-columned mint, but from a complicated digital calculating process known colorfully as mining. 

BITCOIN BASICS
Bitcoin is an alternative type of payment system that is sometimes mentioned in the media. Is it “Internet” or “digital” money? Is it a way to conduct business outside the mainstream financial infrastructure? Is it a new way of life that could transform multiple aspects of society in the future? The answer is yes.
Origins: Bitcoin was created by developer Satoshi Nakamoto in 2008.
Purpose: Bitcoin provides a viable decentralized alternative to the current mainstream financial infrastructure.
Method: Bitcoin enables spending with full transparency through a publicly available ledger known as the blockchain.
Security: A bitcoin transaction involves both a public key, which is generally known to everyone, and a private key known only to the bitcoin user. No coins can be spent without knowing the private key.

BUYING BITCOINS
To use bitcoins, at some point you actually have to acquire some bitcoins. Unfortunately, doing so is not quite as easy as sticking a card into an ATM. The following are a few of the ways you can get your hands on some bitcoins.
Establish that the platform you are using or the person you are buying from is legitimate, as you would with any other online transaction.
Use an exchange such as Gemini to purchase. You register your details through this trusted exchange, deposit your local currency such as USD or GBP, and then purchase the bitcoin at the current rate of exchange.
Buy in person by purchasing directly in the same way.
Remember that once you have purchased your bitcoin, move them to a location that is in within your control. Don’t store them long-term on an exchange.

STORING BITCOINS
Don’t use exchanges to store your bitcoins for any length of time. Exchange storage is only as secure as the exchange’s security infrastructure, so although many people do use this option, the coins are still not within your control. Storing on an exchange should not be considered as anything other than a temporary option.
Instead, use a software wallet (such as the Bitcoin QT client) to store your bitcoins. A software wallet allows you to secure your bitcoins on your own computer. Encrypt the wallet and make backups to ensure your bitcoins are safe. This option requires you to carry out virus checks and have a good understanding of Internet security. Alternatively, you can try a popular online wallet such as the one offered at Blockchain.info while you become familiar with the workings of a wallet. This can simplify the process for you.
Another option is to use a paper wallet to send your coins to a bitcoin address that is not connected to any online exchange nor to software that is on your computer. This bitcoin can only be spent when you decide to manually redeem it through using your private key.

SECURING BITCOINS
Security is as paramount with bitcoin as it is with your personal bank account. The more secure you make access to your bitcoins, the less likely somebody will succeed in nabbing them. When asked to provide a password, for example, make sure it is unique. Don’t use any password that you use on any other website, in case that website is compromised.
When using any online service, look out for additional security such as 2FA, which stands for two-factor authentication. With 2FA, even if somebody else discovers your password, they would also need to gain access to the second-level password which normally is reset every 20–30 seconds using a device such as a smartphone. Always immediately enable this additional security feature if offered.

MINING BITCOINS
Bitcoin mining is accomplished with very fast computers solving complex equations, not with picks and shovels. It’s how bitcoins are created. Without bitcoin miners, no transactions could be processed, and no confirmations could be given to validate your bitcoins were genuine. And of course no new coins could be brought into circulation, because no rewards would be given.
The bitcoin network is only as strong and secure as the people and companies who are supporting it, either by running a bitcoin node or by dedicating computational power to the mining process, which is what miners do.
You have the option of setting up your own “rig” by buying your own hardware (very expensive) or alternatively using a third-party cloud-mining service such as Genesis Mining, which allows you to mine bitcoin without the hassles of maintaining your own hardware.